Journey of A Homebirth Mama

I am not a medical professional. The experience shared here is my own. Please research your options to make your own well-informed decision. See full disclosure here.

Dear mother and father exploring homebirth for the first time,

I see you

I see you desiring a natural, undisturbed birth, hoping for a meeting with your baby that’s sacred and joyful and unhurried.

I see you nervous and anxious about giving birth in a hospital setting with its bright lights and policies and no guarantee of being attended by a professional you know and trust, by the one you’re perhaps building a relationship with right now.

And I see you nervous and anxious about giving birth at home too, with all the unknowns and what-ifs and wondering what your people will think.

I see your careful questions and cautious exploration, your conflicting fears and desires, and the anxiety that comes with the responsibility of choosing.

And I’ve been right where you are

I have given birth to two babies at home. I loved having my babies at home. I am now a committed advocate of homebirths for women who want them. But the journey to get here was long and arduous.

I first heard about homebirth in college when I watched the documentary, “The Business of Being Born”. At the time it seemed like such a brave and beautiful way to bring a baby into the world, yet fear and lack of knowledge kept it like a lovely trinket in a little box, something kept high on a shelf and left unopened for fear of breaking it.

I thought that birth was too risky and too complicated to safely do at home.

Fast forward several years and I was married, hoping to soon start a family. I was nannying for a doula who became a dear friend, and as she was spending nights supporting mamas birthing their babies, I was spending nights on her couch, voraciously reading her library of birth-related books.

Fascinated by birth since childhood, I devoured every bit of information I could about homebirth, evidence-based care, and the physiology of labor. I watched all the documentaries and read all the Ina May. It’s always interesting to me to see how my interests as an adult have just been a continuation of what fascinated me as a child.

With Megan’s encouragement I soon trained as a doula. I attended births, and was on the board for the local birth network. As I learned more and more about normal, physiologic birth, I became more comfortable with the idea of giving birth at home. The lower risk of interventions, c-sections especially, along with the relative safety for low-risk mothers, was very appealing, yet I still had a nagging fear.

I was perhaps most afraid of making a selfish decision that would ultimately put my baby at risk.

I always say Megan “pre-doulaed” me through my fears around birth in general and homebirth in particular.

She met me where I was at, asked me the hard questions, and helped me figure out what was really valuable to me.

I was all about research and statistics and evidence-based care back then. And I still am, but now with a solid dose of valuing my own intuition and heart desires as well.

First Trimester Birth

About a year into my birth obsession, and after a PCOS diagnosis and a year and a half of hoping, I was thrilled to find out I was pregnant. I started researching care providers right away. I would be six months along when my husband was supposed to get out of the military and we would move back home to Michigan, so I knew I wouldn’t have a lot of time to find someone before my baby arrived.

At ten weeks, I went to the urgent care on base due to the light but constant spotting I had been experiencing. Follow-up appointments determined that I was experiencing a molar pregnancy and a d&c was scheduled immediately.

I was devastated.

After the procedure, while I was in recovery, the obgyn came back and told me that though the ultrasound the day before had shown a complete molar pregnancy with no developing baby, the ultrasound they had performed after administering general anesthetic showed a fetus with no heartbeat, measuring 7 weeks and 5 days

In a way I felt more at peace. The debilitating nausea and vomiting I had been experiencing for the last two months had at least been for a baby, not just an abnormal mass of fast-growing, possibly cancerous, placental tissue.

But on the other hand I felt robbed. I hadn’t been able to see my baby. No one had thought to take a photo. If I had known an ultrasound could be so wrong I would have asked them to wake me up, to let me see my baby, heartbeat or not, to have a chance to have something to keep of that baby besides an old faded pregnancy test and a handful of photos of me while I was pregnant.

But I was asleep and unaware and unable to advocate for myself.

I know medical professionals have to make a call in that sort of situation, that it was probably just a standard procedure and that for some women it would have been best. But it wasn’t for me. And I’m the one that has to live with it for the rest of my life.

The first trimester birth of that first baby had a powerful and unavoidable impact on my future births. It felt so violent, and I now know that at some level I processed it as sexual trauma.

I knew that in the future I would do everything I could to never be that powerless again.

With my first baby’s birth my general discomfort in hospitals became complete terror. Every week I returned for bloodwork to ensure my hCG levels were dropping appropriately, and by the time I left I was shaking, nauseated, and vomiting. I jumped at my own reflection in the glass doors. I had nightmares for well over a year.

While I became more afraid of hospitals, I also became increasingly concerned for safety in future births. In the wake of intense grief following that baby’s birth, I knew without a doubt that I would have taken all the unnecessary interventions and their accompanying risks to be able to hold that baby for a minute. I had never doubted that I would do anything to protect the life of my child, but now I was on the other side of loss, knowing firsthand the value of skilled medical help along with the potential for harm even with the best intentions, and the ultimate powerlessness we sometimes have to sustain life in a world of sickness and death and babies born too soon.

Rainbow Baby

Fast forward another eight months and I was pregnant again. I was shocked, ecstatic, hopeful, and full of anxiety all at once. We had recently moved home, and initially I saw an obgyn resident practice. They were the first ones I could find who would accept my insurance, and I was eager to know everything was alright. They didn’t do an ultrasound until 20 weeks, so I was in constant worry until our ultrasound showed a healthy baby boy.

Although I still knew in my heart that I wanted a homebirth, I had set my desire aside because there was simply no way it was possible financially. But as I drew close to my third trimester, my husband got a new job, and a cautious hope started to take root. If I could find a midwife who would take payment plans, maybe a homebirth would be in reach.

Meanwhile, red flags in my care at my obgyn practice made my desire for a homebirth even stronger.

One particular incident sticks out in my mind. I had been slowly going through the items on my birth plan that were most important to me, trying to simultaneously be honest about my hopes and also feel out a realistic idea of what to expect in a situation I knew wouldn’t be quite ideal. When I came to birthing positions I indicated that I wanted to be upright unless there was a medical necessity to do otherwise.

“Oh you can push in whatever position you want.” The ob said. “But when you actually give birth you’ll be on your back with your feet in stirrups.”

“I don’t think that’s necessary if everything is going well.” I said.

“It’s necessary so that we can help you get the baby out.” He said.

“And if you want to do something different you should go somewhere else, but don’t do a homebirth.”

“I don’t think I’m going to need your help.” I thought, but didn’t say aloud.

His mind seemed made up, and I decided against offering to bring in some studies to support my rather bold assertion. I would probably never see him again anyway.

Though that interaction was quite distressing at the time, I now appreciate his blunt honesty, his indirect observation that the care providers I was seeing simply wouldn’t be able to support the birth that was best for me.

At seven months pregnant, I hired my midwife.

Her calm and confident presence immediately inspired trust and even made my husband feel more comfortable with having our baby at home. All the evidence-based practices that I had to fight for in the hospital – delayed cord clamping, intermittent auscultation, upright birth positions – were standard for her. She had been practicing for over 30 years and had attended over 3,000 births. I felt completely confident in her knowledge, experience, and ability to facilitate a safe birth for me and my baby.

Right away my midwife recommended supplements and nutritional changes along with exercises to prepare for birth. I immediately had more energy and less stress. We talked about the things that were really important to me, the things about birth and motherhood I wasn’t confident in, the things I was scared of.

Every week she shared little snippets from a birth she had attended that week. Every story boosted my confidence, and I approached my due date with eager expectation. Even if I ever ended up needing to transfer to the hospital during birth, I believe the cost of a homebirth midwife is totally worthwhile simply in the value of the prenatal care.

My Friend Fear

Though overall I was excited to give birth, I still carried some fears as I approached my due date. I trusted the physiology of the process, but my history of PCOS and miscarriage had undermined confidence in my own physiology.

I had seen birth up close, had supported other women through it, and I knew it would require everything of me. I knew it would be incredibly challenging, and I believed I was strong enough to do it. Not because I was unusually strong, but because women have been doing it for thousands of years.

The strength to give birth, and to do so awake and present to the process, is a common and God-given strength, one that women today often see no need to access, but one that has been vital to the survival and sustenance of life for all of history.

I was confident in that, that women were designed to give birth. And when I doubted that I was designed to give birth, when my fears started running amok, no one fed the fears. My midwife sensibly confronted them with truth and then let them be. They became a means to a safer and better birth, not a facilitator of disengagement and helpless anxiety. Should the fears require action we had a good plan, but no one used my fears against me. I trained them for my own purposes.

And then I gave birth to my son. And the fears didn’t come with me. They stayed outside the sacred space of giving birth, like well-armed knights around a castle, ready to protect in danger. I was not only able to feel safe, but BE safe, because of their presence with me as I carried my baby.

Birth that Heals

I labored gently for a day and half the night. I ate and slept and spent time with my husband. In the wee hours of the morning I knew this was real and I would be meeting my baby soon.

We drove to my parents home where, due to various circumstances, we had chosen to have our baby. The car ride was miserable and I had a moment of weakness as we neared the hospital exit.

“Homebirth isn’t for everyone. I could just go to the hospital and get an epidural right now.”

Then we passed the exit, and I was committed.

We arrived at my parents’ home, and soon my doula and midwife arrived too. My mother, father, sisters, and brother were all there with me and my husband. I groaned and growled and laughed and cried my way through labor.

He was born shortly after sunrise, on a frosty November morning. My midwife passed him between my legs and lay him on the bed in front of me. “I did it!” I thought. I had a moment to look at him before I scooped him into my arms and held him, kneeling there on my parents’ bed.

The healing birth of my oldest son was intensely challenging, yet intensely joyful, just like he is. His birth was treated as the everyday miracle that it was. It was treated as the unfolding of a trustworthy process, not a volatile experiment to be managed and controlled.

Moments after my son was born, joyfully and safely.

I hold this decision of where I birth my babies dear because I think it was the first time in my life that I truly felt I had agency to not only make the best decisions for myself, but to feel confident in those decisions.

I was willing to fight for what was good for me and my baby when just going a conventional route would have in many ways been easier and certainly would have been more comfortable for the people around me.

Having a beautiful, transformative, empowering birth wasn’t because I was just “lucky”. Yes, in birth there are things outside our control, but what we do have control over is the way we prepare and the decisions we make. My decisions mattered.

And your decisions matter too.

The way you prepare matters. The stories you listen to matter. The values you take hold of and the values you reject matter. The hard work you do before birth, the decisions you make, before conception even – it all matters.

You don’t have to have your baby at home to have a good birth, and a few women will end up with a great birth even without much preparation. But approaching giving birth in a thoughtfully engaged manner, knowing what you want and making decisions accordingly will always be good for you and your family.

So dear mama and father, keep learning, keep searching, keep exploring.

If you’re afraid, train your fears to serve you. Treat them with care and respect, lest they use their power to defeat you instead of protect you.

Learn about evidence-based care. Learn about the physiology of birth, how labor unfolds when it’s undisturbed.

Listen to women who have had good births. Talk to women who have had homebirths.

Find out what’s available in your community. Find a care provider you can really trust.

Know what you really want. Don’t be afraid to state it clearly to yourself and to others.

And then make your decisions about where to give birth based on what YOU know is best for yourself and for your baby

You call the shots. The power to make thoughtful decisions that positively affect your birth experience, your baby, your motherhood and fatherhood, and your whole life as a family – that power is yours. Whether you choose to exercise it is up to you.

You’re the only one who can empower you.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed with information or unsure of how to make the best decisions for you and your baby, please seek out support from a local birth professional or contact me. I offer very individualized support and education for expectant parents with varying levels designed to accommodate any budget and need. This is a brief, precious, and sometimes scary stage of life, and the decisions you make now can impact your family for years to come.

With hopes of a joyful birth,

Rebekah

What Your Baby Really Needs: A Minimalist Baby Registry

This post may contain affiliate links. This means that if you make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no additional cost to you. Thank you for supporting this free resource! See full disclosure here.

When you’re preparing for a baby, especially your first baby, all the baby gear and stuff can seem overwhelming! And especially for those of us who are trying to create a frugal or minimalist baby registry, it can be hard to know what to prioritize!

Babies are about as expensive as you make them. They truly don’t need a ton of stuff. And a lot of what they use is used so briefly that it’s easy to find quality items in consignment stores or on Facebook marketplace for a fraction of what it would cost to buy them brand new. But many mamas will have a baby shower and will receive a lot of brand new gifts. Your baby really only has a few basic needs, so when you build registry, register for gifts that are actually going to be helpful to you, not just clutter up your house. Skip to the end for a super basic baby registry checklist!

Your baby needs nourishment.

I breastfed both my babies and didn’t need to pump regularly, but if you use formula or exclusively pump you will need some other items!

Nursing pads. For disposable pads, I like these ones by Lansinoh. For reusable, I like these ones.

A nursing/feeding pillow. Whether you’re feeding from the breast or a bottle, it’s nice to have some extra support while holding the baby. It’s surprising how heavy a baby can get when you’re not used to holding him! I’ve always just used the traditional Boppy pillow, but the breastfeeding support group I go to has the My Breast Friend pillows and they are pretty awesome!

A comfortable place to feed the baby. You very well may already have a great, comfortable place to feed your baby in your home, but if not, it’s worth investing in a comfortable chair for yourself. I love my gliding rocker (WITH the foot stool!). One of my special memories of my first son’s early days is my husband setting up a little nursing corner for me. I had my glider, a side table with a small lamp (great for middle-of-the-night diaper changes!), books to read, a water bottle, and a basket of snacks all within easy reach.

A manual pump. I LOVE this manual silicone pump. I so wish I’d had it when my babies were brand new. It uses gentle suction and you can use it while you’re nursing your baby to catch leaking milk on the other side. If you want to build up any sort of breast milk stash you don’t want any going to waste, especially in the beginning when it’s abundant!

Breast milk storage bags. I’ve used a few different brands, but Lansinoh is my favorite.

You may also want a good book on breastfeeding to have as an easy reference. These are a few of my favorites:

“Breastfeeding Made Simple” This is my favorite. Thorough and easy to reference.

“The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding” Also very thorough, and probably a little more in depth in some ways.

“So That’s What They’re For!” A light, conversational tone. Very easy read, but not quite as easy to reference.

Your baby needs safety.

A place to sleep. What you choose for your baby to sleep in really depends on what your sleep plans are. My babies usually start out in their own bed and then move into my bed at some point during the night. It’s the best way for everyone to get enough rest. Always be aware of safe sleep guidelines, whether your baby is sleeping in his own bed or you are bedsharing.

As newborns, I like my baby very close, so a cosleeper or bassinet works well. A side sleeper is another great option. Your baby has his own space but is still nearby and easy to feed and check on.

I moved both my boys to a crib across the hall around 2 months. At this point they’re more easily disrupted by noise and other people moving around, so everyone sleeps better this way. I bring them into my bed when they need to nurse, and sometimes they still sleep significant portions of the night with me. We registered for a crib and mattress and chose one that could be made into a regular bed once we were done having babies.

A carseat. We like this Chicco seat for newborns and this Graco one for whenever they grow out of the newborn one all the way through booster age.

Infant care kit. I find the easiest, cheapest way to get basic items like a thermometer, a bulb syringe, nail clippers, etc. is to just get a basic nursery care kit. You can replace some items if you want to ( a Nose Frida instead of a bulb syringe, for instance), but at least you’ve got the basics.

Baby wash. I hardly ever use soap on my babies, but you might want to for a bad blowout or something. I usually use a Shea Moisture wash, but I love California Baby too. Both rate low on the Skin Deep Database.

Moisturizer. I rarely use actual lotion on my babies, but when I do it’s Shea Moisture. If I think they need some moisturization, I typically just use olive oil. If they’re going to be out in cold weather where their face might get chapped or windburned, I use raw shea butter. It’s kind of messy and hard to spread, but it’s very gentle and provides a great moisture barrier.

Diaper Ointment. If my babies have a rash, I typically start with going diaperless and using coconut oil or raw shea butter. If I need to I use Boudreaux’s Butt Paste. I try to keep things as natural as possible, but if the rash isn’t going away I use what works.

Your baby needs comfort.

Baby carrier.  A good carrier is a must-have. I’m sure babywearing saved my sanity (or at least my grades) when my oldest was a newborn. For the newborn stage, I love the Moby wrap. It can seem complicated at first, but I really like that it’s fully adjustable and so snuggly. A less complicated option would be the K’tan. The only downside is that you may need more than one size if more than one person will be wearing the baby. A structured carrier can be nice too, and are often easier for dads to manage. The Ergo and 360 are both great options. Use my affiliate links if you want, but honestly you can find really good deals on lightly used ones on Facebook marketplace ; ) Once my babies get a bit bigger (which is usually fast), I love a Mei Tai-style carrier. They are one-size-fits-all and easy to use. Again, easy to find used.

Clothes. People are going to get you clothes, so register for some outfits you actually want. Lots of onesies, socks (my kids never fit into the smallest sizes), sleep sacks, sun hat, jackets, maybe a special event outfit in each size? Just have fun with it.

Blankets. A couple nice big swaddle blankets are great for the newborn stage. I love muslin blankets for summer, and flannel ones for winter. People will probably get you lots of cute, soft blankets, but register for some that are big enough to swaddle with or if swaddling feels overwhelming, try these swaddle sacks. Also, sheets for whatever size crib or pack ‘n’ play you have.

Diapers. Disposable diapers can become really expensive, so by all means register for diapers! My oldest had pretty sensitive skin and could only use Pampers swaddlers. I part-time cloth-diapered both of my boys, and cloth-diapering has been a great money-saver for us! There are so many great cloth diapers options, but I really like the Alvababy pocket diapers, GroVia, and prefolds with Thirsties covers. Don’t forget wipes too!

Sound Machine. White noise is a necessity for decent baby sleep in our small, one-floor house. I like this one for home and this one for travel. As an alternative, you can just use radio static from a CD player. Then when your baby is three like my oldest, he can listen to audiobooks from the library. I know CD’s are a bit obsolete, but I’m comfortable with my three-year-old operating a CD player by himself. Not so with digital downloads and devices connected to the internet.

Speaking of CD’s, both my kids genuinely love music. JJ Heller’s lullabies are beautiful and soothing, both for mamas and for babies. I also love these Scripture-based lullabies and these Celtic lullabies.

Essential Oils. I don’t sell essential oils, nor am I brand loyal. I’ve personally used doTerra and Young Living, and I love both frankincense (immune-boosting and so nice for skin, both mom’s and baby’s) and the Young Living Gentle Baby blend (calming and just smells so good). If you use essential oils with your baby make sure you’re doing it safely!

Your baby needs you.

More than anything, your baby needs you. Your love and care for your baby matters way more than what you feed your baby, whether or not they’re using all organic, non-toxic toys, or what kind of stroller you get. So take good care of yourself in those early days of parenting. Invest in some items or services that will help you be a sane, happy, healthy mother to your little one. And don’t forget about your partner too. Having a new baby is a huge adjustment for both parents!

A few good friends. Being a new mom can be isolating. Maintain the friendships that are really good for you. You may loose some friends during this stage of life and that’s ok too. But spend time with women you can be real with.

Restaurant gift cards and fresh or frozen meals. Whether it be to have a date night with your spouse or order some take out, food that you don’t have to cook or clean up is pretty awesome during those first weeks and months with a new baby.

Help. Society doesn’t like to recognize it, and culturally it’s not always acceptable to ask for help. If you have friends and family members that you’re comfortable receiving help from, take it. If you don’t have a good support system, hiring a postpartum doula for even a few hours a week can be a lifesaver! Even if you do have a good support system, a postpartum doula is specially trained to help care for new mothers in a way that is empowering and validating to their motherhood journey.

Shared experiences with your baby. Memberships to local zoos, museums, or botanical gardens can be a great way for others to invest in experiences and memories for you to have with your baby. And those are priceless.

A Super Basic Registry Checklist {for Getting Started}

What are your must-have baby registry items? Let me know in the comments!

Vaginally-Born Babies Can Have Respiratory Issues Too: My Own Experience

I am not a medical professional. Please research your options and discuss them with your care provider when making health decisions. This post may contain affiliate links. This means that if you make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no additional cost to you. Thank you for supporting this free resource! See full disclosure here.

So in my recent post about the benefits of vaginal birth I shared a lot of studies that show increased rates of asthma, allergies, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and others among children who were born by cesarean. Whenever I share about negatives associated with a certain practice or outcome I’m afraid of making parents who have experienced those outcomes feel criticized or judged or guilty or just bad in any way.

Cesarean birth does increase those risks, but it is just one of many factors. There are so many decisions you make as a parent that are important to your kids. And let’s be honest, physical health matters, but there are lots of things that matter more to our kids, like feeling safe, knowing they’re precious to you, nurturing their souls. And there are all kinds of outcomes we can’t control. Nothing we do can guarantee a perfectly healthy kid.

When I was preparing for the birth of my firstborn avoiding a c-section was a pretty high priority to me. I knew the cesarean rate was high in the US and wanted to decrease my risk as much as possible. I switched care providers around 30 weeks because of the red flags I was seeing in my initial care, and I had a pretty textbook vaginal delivery.

And my son still has a weak respiratory system. So I just want to share my own experience in hopes that parents won’t feel like they’ve somehow failed their child if the child was born by cesarean. And to remind them that there are sometimes circumstances that are simply outside our control, but that there are a thousand good ways to be a parent that are within their control.

My Own Experience with Having a Child with Respiratory Issues

My two sons were both born vaginally. They were born at home, so they weren’t exposed to some of the concerning bacteria more common in a hospital setting.

But my oldest is definitely prone to respiratory issues. It seems like every time there is a respiratory bug going around he gets it and gets it bad. Though he’s never been officially diagnosed with asthma, as a baby he had wheezing , and we gave him albuterol through a nebulizer (though we chose to forego the steroids). I’m pretty cautious with medication for my kids, but it was definitely scary enough for me to give it to him without a second thought. Though he’s not as sensitive as he used to be, he easily develops asthma symptoms whenever he has more than a miniscule amount of dairy.

So he has the birth factors for a lower risk of respiratory issues, yet he still has them. I have my own theories as to why he does have them and why my second child doesn’t (at least not yet).

What My Kids Have in Common

1. With both babies, my water didn’t break until pretty shortly before they were born, so they had less time to be “soaking” in vaginal flora. Was this within my control? Technically, yes, I guess I could have asked to have my midwife break my water sooner, but not much sooner, because I’ve had pretty quick births. And there are risks to artificial rupture of membranes that, for me, aren’t worth the possible benefit of my baby being exposed to vaginal flora for a slightly longer period of time.

2. I don’t know that my own microbiome was all that healthy to pass on to them. Mothers pass their microbiome almost directly to their babies, and my own mother was not breastfed, so when I was born, her own microbiome was probably not in optimal health. And I wasn’t very consistent about taking probiotics or anything. I don’t know if this has anything to do with it; it’s just something I wonder about. Do I have control over the microbiome that was passed on to me? Nope. Could I have improved my own microbiome more? Probably. But I’m not beating myself up about it.

3. My husband has asthma and allergies, so I wonder if there’s a genetic component. Do I have control over his genetics? Nope.

So these are all factors that both my babies have in common – same birth setting, similar birth events, and same dad. But my second baby is now 11 months old, and so far he hasn’t had the respiratory issues that my firstborn has (which started around 9-10 months).

What We Did Differently with Baby #2

Of course there were some differences between my first and second. They obviously have a difference set of genetics, though with some in common. My first was born in late fall, my second in early summer. We skipped the Vitamin K shot with my second. We already knew we weren’t going to circumcise, so we didn’t get it. Honestly, I didn’t give it much thought at the time, and future babies might get the shot, or we may do the oral vitamin K drops. I just haven’t researched it enough to be sure I’m comfortable either way. Here‘s a great article from Evidence Based Birth on the research behind the vitamin K shot.

I’m not sure what if any effect any of those differences have had on my second born’s respiratory health, and some of them aren’t within my control. But there is one thing we purposefully and conscientiously did differently.

We introduced food differently.

With my firstborn, I did a modified baby-led weaning approach.   He had a few tastes of food around 5 months, and I started giving him a small amount of food every day starting at 6 months. He got his first tooth at 7 months, and by 8 or 9 months, I was pretty laid-back about what he ate. He didn’t eat junk food or anything, but as long as it was real, unprocessed food, I wasn’t too worried about it. So he definitely had dairy and eggs and nuts and some of those other harder-to-digest foods well before a year old. And we eventually discovered he had a dairy intolerance that significantly worsened his respiratory issues, especially the asthmatic wheezing.

With my second, I was really hoping to avoid food allergies and intolerances, so I took a different approach. We still did a sort of modified baby-led weaning approach (by modified, I mean we mostly let our babies pick up food and feed themselves, experiencing a greater variety in textures, but when it was convenient we mashed up food and spoon-fed them).

But this time we introduced foods more slowly, starting with foods that were the most easily digestible, and then moving on to harder-to-digest foods, per the recommendation of our naturopath. He also had a few tastes of food around 5 months and started eating food more consistently at 6 months, but he already had teeth by 4 and a half months, so quite a bit earlier than my firstborn.

So far he’s mostly just had fruits and veggies (minus the more acidic ones like strawberries, tomatoes, pineapple, etc.) and beans. He’s getting his molars now, so we’ve tried a few grains (no gluten yet) and a tiny bit of meat. We’ll still wait a while for dairy, gluten, and nuts. We make additions slowly so that we can watch for reactions, and if he does show any signs of sensitivity we stop the new food and try it again after a month or two. By this age, my first born had started wheezing. We’ll have to wait and see if my second baby develops asthma or any other respiratory issues, but so far, so good.

Ultimately, I don’t know if this different approach to feeding will make a big difference for my second child’s health. He also has a different set of genes to work with. But I have more information now, along with my personal experience with my first child, and I’m trying something different.

I share my own experience not because the research and statistics on method of delivery and childhood health doesn’t matter; I believe it does. I just share it because the development of these health issues is so multifaceted, and statistics are just that, statistics. Nothing we do can guarantee perfect physical, psychological, or spiritual health in our children. We just do the best we can with the knowledge we’ve gathered, the choices we’ve made, and the circumstances we’ve been given.  

I’m not totally sold on any one way of infant food introduction. I’d love to hear  your own experience of how you introduced food to your baby and if they have any food allergies, asthma, etc. Tell me about it in the comments!